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Knee

  • Hemiarthroplasty, TSA offer lasting pain relief, improved range of motion

    Source: Healio

    Both hemiarthroplasty and total shoulder arthroplasty offered lasting pain relief, and range of motion was improved at the long-term follow-up; however, unsatisfactory Neer ratings were high, according to study results.

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  • Study: Fewer men receive osteoporosis evaluation after distal radial fracture

    Source: Healio

    Following a distal radial fracture, significantly fewer men received evaluation for osteoporosis compared with women, and evaluation rates were significantly below those established in published guidelines, according to study results.

    Researchers retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 95 men and 344 women older than 50 who were treated for a distal radial fracture during a 5-year period, and assessed whether the patients had received a dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scan and osteoporosis treatment within 6 months following the injury. Using multivariate analysis, the researchers then identified independent predictors of bone mineral density testing and osteoporosis treatment.

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  • Acoustic technique developed to detect knee osteoarthritis

    Source: Medical News Today

    A revolutionary medical technique using sound waves to identify osteoarthritis in the knee has been developed by researchers.

    The UK is leading this new field of health research based on listening to the sounds emitted by the body.

    Microphones are attached to the knees of patients, and the high frequency sound waves emanating from their knees are measured as they stand up. These acoustic emissions are interpreted by computer software to give information about the health of the patient’s knee.

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  • Collagen for the knee: Gel-like implant invented

    Source: Science Daily

    Millions of people suffer cartilage damage to the knee every year. Cartilage injuries are not only painful; they can lead to osteoarthritis decades later. In the course of the disease, the protective shock absorbing cartilage that covers the bone within the joint slowly is removed until the bone is finally exposed, typically requiring an artificial joint replacement. A biotechnology company has developed a one-step minimally-invasive surgical procedure for the treatment of cartilage defects: a gel-like implant.

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  • ‘A glass of milk a day’ may delay knee osteoarthritis in women

    Source: Medical News Today

    A degenerative disease causing pain and swelling of the knee joints, knee osteoarthritis currently has no cure. But researchers say drinking milk every day has been linked to reduced progression of the disease.

    Publishing their results in the American College of Rheumatology journal Arthritis Care & Research, the researchers say while their findings show that women who regularly drank fat-free or low-fat milk experienced delayed progression of knee osteoarthritis (OA), those who ate cheese actually experienced an increase in progression of the disease.

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  • Study: UCL reconstruction surgery likely to put major league pitchers back on the field

    Source: Healio

    Major League Baseball pitchers who undergo ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction have a strong likelihood of resuming their professional baseball careers after surgery, according to results of a recently published study.

    “When compared with demographic-matched controls, patients who underwent [ulnar collateral ligament] UCL reconstruction had better results in multiple performance measures,” Brandon J. Erickson, MD, and colleagues stated in the study. “Reconstruction of the UCL allows for a predictable and successful return to the [Major League Baseball] MLB.”

    The study analyzed 179 MLB pitchers who underwent UCL reconstruction. Overall, 174 (97.2%) resumed pitching in professional organized baseball and 148 (83%) returned to the MLB level. Mean time to return to MLB was 20.5 months and the average career after surgery was 3.9 years, however, 56 pitchers were still pitching at the start of the 2013 MLB season.

    Pitchers had fewer losses, lower earned run average, losing percentage, hits per inning and fewer walks, hits and home runs allowed after UCL reconstruction than before surgery.

    “There is a high rate of [return to pitching] RTP in professional baseball after UCL reconstruction,” Erickson and colleagues concluded. “Performance declined before surgery and improved after surgery.” -by Christian Ingram

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  • High-demand patients returned to work quickly after arthroscopic treatment of a dislocated elbow

    Source: Healio

    Investigators found patients returned to work 2.7 weeks after acute arthroscopic repair of the radial ulnohumeral ligament for elbow dislocation.

    Michael J. O’Brien, MD, and colleagues retrospectively reviewed the results of surgeries they performed in 14 consecutive high-demand patients. The investigators defined high-demand patients as those who needed both hands to work or play a competitive sport. One patient in the series was a surgeon.

    Few guidelines exist about return to work after elbow dislocation, according to O’Brien, who presented the results at the American Academy of Orthopaedics Surgeons Annual Meeting, here.

    In this series, “All patients returned to their pre-injury level of function,” he said.

    The investigators followed the patients for an average of 30 months after either acute or subacute treatment of the radial ulnohumeral ligament (RUHL).

    O’Brien said all patients achieved a Mayo Elbow Performance Score that was excellent and ranged from 95 points to 100 points.

    According to the paper abstract, results using a goniometer showed a final range of motion from -3 º in full extension to full flexion that exceeded 130 º.

    O’Brien said the return to work was longer — at about 4.6 weeks — in the patients who underwent arthroscopic stabilization subacutely.

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  • Ask a Sports Medicine Doc: Hip injuries among youth

    Source: VailDaily

    Q: My 14 year old daughter is a competitive ski racer and has been having hip pain. Could she have a labral tear?

    A: Hip injuries are on the rise in adolescent athletes. This is due to the increasing number of young athletes participating in organized sports as well as advances in technology that have improved clinician’s diagnostic ability.

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  • Smith & Nephew DYONICS(TM) PLAN brings first-of-its-kind, individualized surgical planning to hip arthroscopy

    Source: The Wall Street Journal

    Smith & Nephew (NYSE:SNN;LSE:SN), the global medical technology business, will launch its DYONICS PLAN Hip Impingement Planning System at this week’s American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) annual meeting in New Orleans. Unlike standard imaging tools, DYONICS PLAN is a revolutionary 3D software system that allows surgeons to visualize, assess and generate a comprehensive surgical report for each patient’s unique Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) surgery before that patient ever enters the operating room.

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  • Genetics may explain high-functioning senior athletes with hip abnormalities

    Source: Science Daily

    Genetics may explain why some senior athletes are high functioning despite having one or both hip abnormalities typically associated with early onset osteoarthritis: developmental dislocation of the hip (dysplasia), a loose hip joint; or femoroacetabular impingement (FAI), a condition in which the hip bones are abnormally shaped.

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